24 Hours in Lisbon

24 Hours in Lisbon


9am: Wake up, throw on some light summer clothes and head out on the street to one of the many cafés serving your morning coffee and pastry. We love slowly sipping an espresso while watching the city come to life.
Lisbon café
11am: Feeling energised and ready to discover Lisbon, we recommend catching one of the famous trams up the hills towards Castelo de São Jorge, which offers truly spectacular views of the city. Wander around a tranquil oasis amidst the fortified brick walls and feel yourself transported back in time.
Lisbon tram
Castelo de Sao Jorge
Castelo de Sao Jorge2pm: Although the city itself has a lot to offer, we also recommend checking out some of the surrounding coast cities while in the area. Hop on a train from the central station heading out to quaint Cascais. Make sure to grab a seat on the left hand side on the way out of Lisbon, to get a view of the Christ the King monument clearly visible across the canal. It measures almost 80 metres in height and the construction initiated in year 1959.

In Cascais you might want to have lunch at one of the restaurants in the lovely town square, before soaking some sun at a nearby beach. Cascais is known as the place where royals and celebrities retreat when they need a break from the hustle and bustle of the city – it’s easy to understand why with its beautiful scenery, cute restaurants and shops and relaxed atmosphere.
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IMG_57846pm: Back in Lisbon, you should feel sufficiently relaxed and revived for a few hours of shopping. The city centre boasts all the usual suspects (high street brands and more high end luxury shops) whereas the excitement truly lies in the cool second hand shops you can find both in some of the side streets in the city centre and amidst other quirky shops up in the charming Bairro Alto district.
IMG_58298pm: By this time, your stomach should start rumbling – which only means one thing: it’s dinner time. We suggest heading to the Alfama district. A more shabby district where beggars and litter are both more present. Despite this, we feel oddly at home here. The streets are narrow and windy, people’s laundry is air drying on lines spanning across your head as you make your way through, and there are flags and other decorations on every street corner. Sit down on one of the street side restaurants or find one of the famous fado spots where you can listen to this very particular and soul touching singing form that has become a Portuguese stample.

10pm: Although Lisbon boasts some classic, loud bars and clubs, we like to keep it more low key in the Portuguese capital. Bairro Alto offers a selection of cool and cosy places where you can mingle with locals and tourists alike. Why not head to a rock’n’ roll cupcakery which also doubles as a bar? And remember to sample some Portuguese wine, which they are so proud of!
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